Queen & Slim

Review by Sophie Furlong Tighe Queen & Slim opens on a familiar but incredibly modern scene: two people on a tinder date. It’s awkward and stilted like many first interactions. Immediately we see the difference between the two characters; Queen (Jodie-Turner Smith) feeling uncomfortable in the dingy diner Slim (Daniel Kaluuya) takes her to, SlimContinue reading “Queen & Slim”

Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker

Review by James McCleary To call Disney’s Star Wars revival a mixed bag would be an understatement. Their big debut, The Force Awakens, was a safe and secure soft reboot which was generally liked but not loved by audiences, while The Last Jedi was either the first worthy sequel to the original trilogy or anContinue reading “Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker”

Long Day’s Journey into Night

Review by Christopher Kestell Bi Gan’s Long Day’s Journey into Night (no relation to the play of the same name by Eugene O’Neill) stars Huang Jue and Tang Wei and is easily one of the most unforgettable cinematic experiences you will ever have, whether you enjoy it or not. Ostensibly the story of a manContinue reading “Long Day’s Journey into Night”

Jojo Rabbit

Review by Luke Bradley If trailers hadn’t given the game away, Jojo Rabbit’s opening sequence, accompanied by a German dub of The Beatles’ ‘I Want To Hold Your Hand’, would wisely sets the tone for the film ahead. Taiki Waititi, the mastermind behind Thor: Ragnarok and Hunt for the Wilderpeople, has made a film aboutContinue reading “Jojo Rabbit”

Marriage Story

Review by Johannes Black Listening to his father’s fifteenth studio-album, Blood on the Tracks (1975), Jackob Dylan (the estranged child of Bob and Sara) recognised it as “my parents talking”: a conversation in lyrics between two people once so familiar. His remark is, of course, belated, having only properly understood their divorce with the hindsightContinue reading “Marriage Story”

Motherless Brooklyn

Review by Johannes Black It is a recurring trend amongst contemporary American novelists – such as John Updike, Saul Bellow or Norman Mailer – that cinema has generally steered clear of their literature. Such fictions represent dense, philosophical moodscapes, following the quest of an individual as they try to make sense of an increasingly differentContinue reading “Motherless Brooklyn”

The Irishman

Review by Eoin O’Donnell Amid the chaos of debate raging over Martin Scorsese’s incendiary comments on the state of today’s cinema, you’d almost be forgiven for missing the release of his newest film. Like the Marvel blockbusters he’s been decrying, it’s a visual effects-heavy, witty and perhaps overly long affair, with a pantheon of legendaryContinue reading “The Irishman”